Cooma North students help record history

Ian Campbell, ABC South East presenter, is joined by the students of Cooma North P.S. They are accompanied by parent, Mrs Hobbs (left), and teacher Anne Graham (far right).

Ian Campbell, ABC South East presenter, is joined by the students of Cooma North P.S. They are accompanied by parent, Mrs Hobbs (left), and teacher Anne Graham (far right).

Cooma North year six students at the ABC Bega studios for the WW1 Roll of Honour centenary project. Back row-left to right: Tayla Williams, Tionie Fitzgerald, Amy Hobbs. Front row: Laura Hobbs and Anna Haylock

Cooma North year six students at the ABC Bega studios for the WW1 Roll of Honour centenary project. Back row-left to right: Tayla Williams, Tionie Fitzgerald, Amy Hobbs. Front row: Laura Hobbs and Anna Haylock

COOMA North Public students have played an important role in World War One centenary projects, when they visited the ABC studios in Bega on Friday, June 20.

Five year six students were given the opportunity to record themselves reading the names of some of the 62,000 Australians who lost their lives in the WW1 as part of the Roll of Honour Soundscape project.

Their young voices will serve as a poignant reminder of the toll the war took on Australia and their recordings will be played as part of a special honour roll reading in the Australian War Memorial.

Cooma North teacher Anne Graham accompanied the group to the Bega studios, and says it was pleasing to watch the students become active participants in remembering Australia's participation in the war.

"The students got a lot out of the recordings, it was a personal experience for them," Ms Graham said.

"Two of the students had relatives directly involved in WW1 and now on the honour roll."

"They know it's a solemn activity they were doing, it provides a sense of history."

Tionie Fitzgerald, Anna Haylock, Tayla Williams, Amy and Laura Hobbs made the trip to Bega where they joined ABC South East Radio Content Manager and breakfast presenter Ian Campbell in the studio to record the names.

Each student learnt and recited the names and ages of 10 people on the honour roll, allowing them to understand the person behind the name.

"Ian was fantastic with the students, he really put them at ease," Ms Graham said.

"Anytime something is recorded it can be hard to do, but they got through it pretty quickly."

Primary school children across the nation will take to their local recording studios to read out all the names on the Roll of Honour, with the recordings commencing in August to mark the centenary of the war's outbreak. The project will enhance the iconic Roll of Honour in the Memorial's Commemorative Area, while retaining a respectful and solemn experience for visitors.

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